Market Penetration

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DEFINITION of 'Market Penetration'

A measure of the amount of sales or adoption of a product or service compared to the total theoretical market for that product or service. The amount of sales or adoption can be an individual company's sale or industry while the theoretical market can be the total population or an estimate of total potential consumers for the product.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Market Penetration'

For example, if there are 300 million people in a country and 65 million of those people have cell phones then the market penetration of cell phones would be approximately 22%. This would mean in theory there are still 235 million more potential customers for cell phones, which may be a good sign of growth for cell phone makers. In general, the older the offering or industry, the greater the market penetration.

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