Market Performance Committee

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DEFINITION

A committee, consisting of members and allied members of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) who monitor the specialists' effectiveness in assuring an orderly market for their stocks. The Market Performance Committee has the additional responsibility of assigning new or existing issues to the specialists.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

A specialist shall be required to attend an informal meeting with the Market Performance Committee if they have had poor performance to discuss possible ways assuring better performance in the future. The Market Performance Committee will also review potential applicants who want to become specialists for particular stocks.


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