Market Value Of Equity

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DEFINITION of 'Market Value Of Equity'

The total dollar market value of all of a company's outstanding shares. Market value of equity is calculated by multiplying the company's current stock price by its number of outstanding shares. A company's market value of equity is therefore always changing as these two input variables change. A company's market value of equity differs from its book value of equity because the former does not take into account the company's growth potential.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Market Value Of Equity'

Market value of equity is basically a synonym for market capitalization. It is used to measure a company's size and helps investors to diversity their investments across companies of different sizes and different levels of risk.

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