Market Efficiency

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Market Efficiency'

The degree to which stock prices reflect all available, relevant information. Market efficiency was developed in 1970 by Economist Eugene Fama who's theory efficient market hypothesis (EMH), stated that it is not possible for an investor to outperform the market because all available information is already built into all stock prices. Investors who agree with this statement tend to buy index funds that track overall market performance.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Market Efficiency'

Investors and academics have a wide range of viewpoints on how efficient the market actually is, as reflected in the strong, semi-strong and weak versions of the EMH. At the other end of the spectrum from Fama and his followers are the value investors, who believe that stocks can become undervalued, or priced below what they are actually worth. Successful value investors make their money by purchasing stocks when they are undervalued and selling them when their price rises to meet or exceed their intrinsic worth.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Price Efficiency

    The premise that asset prices are efficient, to the extent that ...
  2. Enhanced Index Fund - EIF

    A mutual fund that tracks a stock market index, but with certain ...
  3. Behavioral Finance

    A field of finance that proposes psychology-based theories to ...
  4. Active Index Fund

    A type of index fund where a fund manager bases the fund's initial ...
  5. Imperfect Market

    A market where information is not quickly disclosed to all participants ...
  6. Efficient Market Hypothesis - EMH

    An investment theory that states it is impossible to "beat the ...
Related Articles
  1. Active Trading

    4 Steps To Creating A Better Investment Strategy

    Make your trading safer and more streamlined by following these simple guidelines.
  2. Investing Basics

    Stock Basics Tutorial

    If you're new to the stock market and want the basics, this is the tutorial for you!
  3. Active Trading

    What Is Market Efficiency?

    The efficient market hypothesis (EMH) suggests that stock prices fully reflect all available information in the market. Is this possible?
  4. Fundamental Analysis

    Find The Right Fit With Probability Distributions

    Discover a few of the most popular probability distributions and how to calculate them.
  5. Active Trading Fundamentals

    Efficient Market Hypothesis: Is The Stock Market Efficient?

    Deciding whether it's possible to attain above-average returns requires an understanding of EMH.
  6. Active Trading Fundamentals

    Mad Money ... Mad Market?

    Jim Cramer's spirited recommendations are a case study in irrational market behavior.
  7. Options & Futures

    Financial Concepts

    Diversification? Optimal portfolio theory? Read this tutorial and these and other financial concepts will be made clear.
  8. Investing

    Why Is Arbitrage Trading Legal?

    Not only is arbitrage legal in the US and most developed countries, it can be beneficial to the overall health of a market.
  9. Fundamental Analysis

    What is a Null Hypothesis?

    In statistics, a null hypothesis is assumed true until proven otherwise.
  10. Chart Advisor

    Why Now is the Time for Food and Beverage Stocks

    As volatility rears its ugly head, it's natural to investigate stable sectors such as food and beverages. Here's an appropriately-named ETF to consider.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Price-To-Sales Ratio - PSR

    A valuation ratio that compares a company’s stock price to its revenues. The price-to-sales ratio is an indicator of the ...
  2. Hurdle Rate

    The minimum rate of return on a project or investment required by a manager or investor. In order to compensate for risk, ...
  3. Market Value

    The price an asset would fetch in the marketplace. Market value is also commonly used to refer to the market capitalization ...
  4. Preference Shares

    Company stock with dividends that are paid to shareholders before common stock dividends are paid out. In the event of a ...
  5. Accrued Interest

    1. A term used to describe an accrual accounting method when interest that is either payable or receivable has been recognized, ...
  6. Absorption Costing

    A managerial accounting cost method of expensing all costs associated with manufacturing a particular product. Absorption ...
Trading Center