Market Jitters

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DEFINITION of 'Market Jitters'

Feelings of nervousness created by uncertainty or fear about the current investment environment. Market jitters can relate to an individual who stresses about their current investments, or to the investment community as a whole, caused by over-arching economic factors such as a recession or market swoon.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Market Jitters'

Market jitters can be caused by poor corporate earnings, high rates of unemployment or uncertainty with the Federal Reserve interest rate decisions, among other things. Investors should remember, however, that the market cycle is, as the name would suggest, cyclical, and that those choosing to actively monitor their investments in the market should expect to experience market jitters every so often.

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