Mass Market Retailer

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DEFINITION of 'Mass Market Retailer'

A company that sells affordably priced products that appeal to a wide variety of consumers. Mass market retailers are not necessarily known for selling durable, high-quality merchandise or for having exceptional customer service, but they do meet consumers' wants and needs, at reasonable prices. Examples of mass market retailers include big box stores such as Target, Sam's Club and Best Buy, as well as brands like Levi Strauss and Gap, and e-retailers like Amazon. Supermarket, drugstore, mass merchandise and warehouse chains, are all considered mass market retailers.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Mass Market Retailer'

By contrast, luxury retailers sell products targeted at wealthy consumers, who purchase upscale items. These products tend to be out of reach, financially, for the average consumer, although aspirational consumers may purchase them anyway, and are associated with higher quality and superior customer service. Examples of luxury retailers include Bergdorf Goodman, Barney's, Tiffany and Saks.



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