Master Trust

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Master Trust'

A collection of funds from individual investors that are pooled together in order to obtain wholesale prices and rates unavailable for regular investors.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Master Trust'

This is kind of like bulk shopping. When you offer to buy more securities, companies are willing to give a better rate. Therefore, a group of investors can combine their assets for greater leverage.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Portfolio

    A grouping of financial assets such as stocks, bonds and cash ...
  2. Trust

    A fiduciary relationship in which one party, known as a trustor, ...
  3. Net Asset Value - NAV

    A mutual fund's price per share or exchange-traded fund's (ETF) ...
  4. Trustee

    A person or firm that holds or administers property or assets ...
  5. Mutual Fund

    An investment vehicle that is made up of a pool of funds collected ...
  6. See-Through Trust

    A trust that is treated as the beneficiary of an individual retirement ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is a family Limited Liability Company (LLC)?

    A family limited liability company (LLC) is formed by family members to conduct business in a state that permits such form ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Are so-called self-offering and self-management covered by "Financial Instruments ...

    As the Financial Services Agency (FSA) explains, self-offering of interests in collective investment schemes falls under ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How is maintenance of standard of living for survivors accomplished in estate planning?

    Estate planning is an integral component of comprehensive financial planning, as it allows individuals and couples to maintain ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the difference between an intervivos trust and a testamentary trust?

    Estate planning offers tools to establish and maintain effective control over cash, investment and real estate assets during ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are some examples of smart beta ETFs that use passive and active management?

    There are a number of smart beta exchange-traded funds (ETFs) that use passive and active management, including the WisdomTree ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are the differences between a Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) and a Certified ...

    The differences between a Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) and a Certified Financial Planner (CFP) are many, but comes down ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Personal Finance

    4 Tips For Joining An Investment Club

    These circles of like-minded people are a wonderful way to explore investing without laying out large sums.
  2. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Mutual Fund Basics Tutorial

    Learn about the basics - and the pitfalls - of investing in mutual funds.
  3. Taxes

    3 Secrets You Didn't Know About Estate Planning

    Every advisor and saver needs to know these three estate planning secrets.
  4. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Looking To Invest In Texas? Here Is How

    Ranging from energy to household names, here are some of the top investment opportunities in Texas.
  5. Retirement

    Roth 401(k) Vs. Roth IRA: Which One Is Better?

    It all depends on your age, your income - and your plans for your retirement nest egg.
  6. Professionals

    How to Best Navigate Taxes in Retirement

    Here's a rundown on tax strategies that can help extend the life of a nest egg.
  7. Personal Finance

    5 Signs You Need A Postnup

    They're not the most fun thing to contemplate, but these contracts can actually help a marriage.
  8. Credit & Loans

    What is a Syndicated Loan?

    A syndicated loan is one that involves a group of lenders (called the syndicate) who pool their lending resources to make a loan.
  9. Investing Basics

    Explaining the Volcker Rule

    The Volcker Rule prevents commercial banks from engaging in high-risk, speculative trading for their own accounts.
  10. Investing Basics

    What Does a Financial Intermediary Do?

    A financial intermediary is an institution that acts as a go-between in a financial transaction.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Treasury Yield

    The return on investment, expressed as a percentage, on the debt obligations of the U.S. government. Treasuries are considered ...
  2. Bund

    A bond issued by Germany's federal government, or the German word for "bond." Bunds are the German equivalent of U.S. Treasury ...
  3. European Central Bank - ECB

    The central bank responsible for the monetary system of the European Union (EU) and the euro currency. The bank was formed ...
  4. Quantitative Easing

    An unconventional monetary policy in which a central bank purchases private sector financial assets in order to lower interest ...
  5. Current Account Deficit

    A measurement of a country’s trade in which the value of goods and services it imports exceeds the value of goods and services ...
  6. International Monetary Fund - IMF

    An international organization created for the purpose of: 1. Promoting global monetary and exchange stability. 2. Facilitating ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!