Material Insider Information

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DEFINITION of 'Material Insider Information'

Material information, about certain aspects of a company, that has not yet been made public but that will have at least a small impact on the company's share price once released. It is illegal for holders of material insider information to use the information - however it was received - to their advantage in trading stock, or to provide the information to family members or friends so they can use it to make trades.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Material Insider Information'

Getting information that a company's expected earnings per share for a given quarter could be markedly poorer than expected, or getting information about developments in an ongoing lawsuit involving a company are both examples of material insider information.

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