Material News

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DEFINITION of 'Material News'

News released by a company that might affect the value of its securities or influence investors' decisions.

Also known as "materiality."

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Material News'

Material news includes information such as unusual corporate events, unexpected earnings results (whether good or bad), stock splits, etc.

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