Mathematical Economics

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DEFINITION of 'Mathematical Economics'

Mathematical economics is a discipline of economics that utilizes mathematic principles and methods to create economic theories and to investigate economic quandaries. Mathematics permits economists to conduct quantifiable tests and create models to predict future economic activity.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Mathematical Economics'

Mathematical economics relies on statistical observations to prove, disprove and predict economic behavior. Although the discipline is heavily influenced by the bias of the researcher, mathematics allows economists to explain observable phenomenon and provides the backbone for theoretical interpretation.

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