Mature Firm

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DEFINITION of 'Mature Firm'

A company that is well-established in its industry, with a well-known product and loyal customer following with average growth. Mature firms are categorized according to the business stage it is currently in. These types of firms have passed the stage of rapid growth and tend to grow at the same rate as the overall economy. They also tend to have several equally well-established competitors, making price competition a significant factor in their ability to increase profits.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Mature Firm'

Businesses are usually thought of as going through between four to eight phases. For example: Idea, emerging/startup, growing, expanding, mature and finally declining. The stocks of mature firms often pay dividends because the companies are past the point of needing to reinvest all their profits in the company, like they did when it was growing rapidly. Coca-Cola, Pepsi Co., Johnson & Johnson and Procter & Gamble are examples of mature firms. They have been around for many years and sell products that consumers use on a regular basis, but they also face ongoing, significant competition.

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