Maturity Mismatch

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DEFINITION of 'Maturity Mismatch'

The tendency of a business to mismatch its balance sheet by possessing more short-term liabilities than short-term assets and having more assets than liabilities for medium- and long-term obligations. How a company organizes the maturity of its assets and liabilities can give details into the liquidity of its position.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Maturity Mismatch'

Changes in a company's maturity profile can also be useful in learning more about the status of a company because it indicates a company's ability to borrow. Using the maturity mismatching structure of a company along with additional information can help investors to assess the company's liquidity position.

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