McFadden Act

AAA

DEFINITION of 'McFadden Act'

Federal legislation that gave individual states the authority to govern bank branches located within the state. This includes branches of national banks located within state lines. The act was intended to allow national banks to compete with state banks by permitting them to open branches within state limitations.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'McFadden Act'

The McFadden Act was passed by Congress in 1927. It was modified in 1994 by the Riegle-Neale Interstate Banking and Branching Efficiency Act, which allowed banks to open limited service bank branches across state lines by merging with other banks. This act repealed the earlier provision within the McFadden Act prohibiting this practice.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Glass-Steagall Act

    An act the U.S. Congress passed in 1933 as the Banking Act, which ...
  2. Interstate Banking

    The expansion of banking across state lines. Interstate banking ...
  3. Bank

    A financial institution licensed as a receiver of deposits. There ...
  4. SENTRI

    This U.S. program grants pre-approved travelers access to a faster ...
  5. Collection-Proof

    A debtor who doesn’t have any assets that a creditor can collect ...
  6. Judgment Proof

    Someone who doesn’t have enough assets for a creditor to seize ...
Related Articles
  1. Taxes

    Changes In Tax Legislation And Regulation

    Keeping on top of these amendments can help you avoid penalties and take advantage of benefits.
  2. Taxes

    Dividend Tax Rates: What Investors Need To Know

    Find out how legislation enacted in 2003 is benefiting both investors and corporations, and when it's scheduled to expire.
  3. Options & Futures

    The Chinese Wall Protects Against Conflicts Of Interest

    After the crash of 1929, this barrier helped define ethical limits, but it did little to prevent fraud.
  4. Options & Futures

    Changing The Face Of Bankruptcy

    A 2005 law attempts to unmask fraudulent debtors and still save those who are struggling. Will it affect you?
  5. Economics

    Are Greece’s Worries Almost Over?

    Last week ended with the news that Greece and the European Union (EU) finance ministers struck a deal to temporarily extend the Greek bailout program.
  6. Economics

    Why Is Ukraine At War? A Russian Rivalry With West

    Huge power games which are being played behind the Ukrainian conflict are rooted in a previous revolution, a past Cold War, and an old Russia-West rivalry.
  7. Economics

    Does A Junk Rating Reflect Russia's Fundamentals?

    Moody’s, like other credit rating agencies, has downgraded Russia’s sovereign debt rating to non-investment grade, but does this reflect Russia's economy?
  8. Economics

    This Is A Small Country With Huge Potential to Grow

    Trinidad and Tobago's increased revenue and economic success have been primarily generated by its energy sector, but it still might be best to diversify.
  9. Economics

    Popular Places Where U.S. Citizens Need A Visa

    A U.S. passport will get you into many countries, but not everywhere. Here's how to visit five of the most popular destinations that require visas.
  10. Economics

    What's a Subsidy?

    A subsidy is a benefit given to an individual, business or institution, typically by the government. Subsidies are given to promote a social good or an economic policy. The government usually ...

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Subsidy

    A benefit given by the government to groups or individuals usually in the form of a cash payment or tax reduction. The subsidy ...
  2. Sunk Cost

    A cost that has already been incurred and thus cannot be recovered. A sunk cost differs from other, future costs that a business ...
  3. Technical Skills

    1. The knowledge and abilities needed to accomplish mathematical, engineering, scientific or computer-related duties, as ...
  4. Prepaid Expense

    A type of asset that arises on a balance sheet as a result of business making payments for goods and services to be received ...
  5. Gordon Growth Model

    A model for determining the intrinsic value of a stock, based on a future series of dividends that grow at a constant rate. ...
  6. Cost Accounting

    A type of accounting process that aims to capture a company's costs of production by assessing the input costs of each step ...
Trading Center