Medium Term

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DEFINITION of 'Medium Term'

An asset holding period or investment horizon that is intermediate in nature. The exact period of time that is considered medium term depends on the investor's personal preferences, as well as on the asset class under consideration. In the fixed-income market, bonds that have a maturity period of between five to 10 years are considered to be medium-term bonds.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Medium Term'

A day trader who seldom holds open positions overnight may consider a stock that is held for a couple of weeks as a "medium term" position, whereas a long-term investor may define medium term as a holding period of one to three years. Similarly, home owners may regard anything less than 10 years as a medium term horizon when it comes to real estate.

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