Meeting Of The Minds

DEFINITION of 'Meeting Of The Minds'

An agreement between parties in which each party is aware of the commitments that is being made by each individual. Meeting of the minds, or consensus ad idem, is associated with contract law and is fundamental for the existence of a contract. If both parties to a contract make a mistake in the contract's creation, and may thus be agreeing to perform actions other than what both expected, there would not be a meeting of the minds.

BREAKING DOWN 'Meeting Of The Minds'

For example, a business needing to resupply its inventory of toys and speaks with a local supplier. The businessman indicates that he is looking to buy the supplier's stock, which he takes to be the supply of toys that the supplier has. The supplier, however, thinks that the businessman is looking to buy out his business, hence his "stock" of shares. Because both parties are not agreeing to the same material exchange there is no meeting of the minds, and thus no agreement.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Third Party Beneficiary

    A person who will benefit from a contract made between two other ...
  2. Bilateral Contract

    A bilateral contract is a reciprocal arrangement between two ...
  3. Unilateral Contract

    A legally enforceable promise - between legally competent parties ...
  4. Contract Unit

    The actual amount of the underlying asset represented by a single ...
  5. Pre-Settlement Risk

    The risk that one party of a contract will fail to meet the terms ...
  6. Italian Derivatives Market

    A derivatives exchange headquartered in Milan, Italy. The Italian ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing

    How Do Futures Contracts Work?

    Futures contracts are one of the most important financial innovations in history, but they are often misunderstood. Find out this contract is used to transfer risk between different parties. ...
  2. Budgeting

    4 Contract Essentials You Need to Know

    Over your lifetime, you’ll be asked to sign lots of contracts – perhaps agreeing to purchase a home, a car or to join a new gym or online dating service.
  3. Options & Futures

    Stock Futures vs Stock Options

    A full analysis of when is it better to trade stock futures vs when is it better to trade options on a particular stock. A quick overview of how each of them works and why would a trader, investor, ...
  4. Options & Futures

    Why Forward Contracts Are The Foundation Of All Derivatives

    This article expands on the complex structure of derivatives by explaining how an investor can assess interest rate parity and implement covered interest arbitrage by using a currency forward ...
  5. Insurance

    Futures Fundamentals: How The Market Works

    The futures market is a centralized marketplace for buyers and sellers from around the world who meet and enter into futures contracts. Pricing can be based on an open cry system, or bids and ...
  6. Stock Analysis

    Party City Holdings: How It's Fared Since Its 2015 IPO (PRTY)

    Learn about Party City Holding's performance as a public company. Investors would have lost much more than the Russell 2000 Index by investing after the IPO.
  7. Stock Analysis

    Auto Suppliers Pressured

    Automakers' woes have spilled over to the auto suppliers, with the latest developments for Chrysler and GM putting suppliers under more pressure.
  8. Options & Futures

    Beginner's Guide To E-Mini Futures Contracts: E-Mini Specifications

    Each e-mini contract has certain specifications as outlined by its host exchange. Ticker SymbolEach contract has a ticker symbol, or an arrangement of letters representing the specific contract. ...
  9. Options & Futures

    Beginner's Guide To Trading Futures: The Basic Structure of the Futures Market

    In this opening section, we will take a look at how the futures market works, how it differs from other markets and how the use of leverage impacts your investing. How Futures WorkYou are probably ...
  10. Investing Basics

    Investing in Crude Oil Futures: The Risks and Rewards

    Learn about the risks and rewards of trading oil futures contracts. Read about a few strategies to limit the risk in trading oil futures contracts.
RELATED FAQS
  1. How can a futures trader exit a position prior to expiration?

    A futures contract is an agreement to buy or sell a commodity at a pre-determined price and quantity at a future date in ... Read Answer >>
  2. How do the investment risks differ between options and futures?

    Learn what differences exist between futures and options contracts and how each can be used to hedge against investment risk ... Read Answer >>
  3. How are forward contracts regulated in the United States?

    Read about the risks of forward contracts and why they are not readily subject to regulation, including what happens when ... Read Answer >>
  4. How are arm's-length transactions determined by law?

    Determine if transactions are conducted at arm's length by checking if the parties to a contract are independent and transact ... Read Answer >>
  5. Why is the initial value of a forward contract set to zero?

    Discover why the initial value of a forward contract is set to zero; read about financial mathematics and exchange logic ... Read Answer >>
  6. What is a derivative?

    A derivative is a contract between two or more parties whose value is based on an agreed-upon underlying financial asset, ... Read Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. MACD Technical Indicator

    Moving Average Convergence Divergence (or MACD) is a trend-following momentum indicator that shows the relationship between ...
  2. Over-The-Counter - OTC

    Over-The-Counter (or OTC) is a security traded in some context other than on a formal exchange such as the NYSE, TSX, AMEX, ...
  3. Quarter - Q1, Q2, Q3, Q4

    A three-month period on a financial calendar that acts as a basis for the reporting of earnings and the paying of dividends.
  4. Weighted Average Cost Of Capital - WACC

    Weighted average cost of capital (WACC) is a calculation of a firm's cost of capital in which each category of capital is ...
  5. Basis Point (BPS)

    A unit that is equal to 1/100th of 1%, and is used to denote the change in a financial instrument. The basis point is commonly ...
  6. Sharing Economy

    An economic model in which individuals are able to borrow or rent assets owned by someone else.
Trading Center