Melt Up



A dramatic and unexpected improvement in the investment performance of an asset class driven partly by a stampede of investors who don't want to miss out on its rise rather than by fundamental improvements in the economy. Gains created by a melt up are considered an unreliable indication of the direction the market is ultimately headed, and melt ups often precede melt downs.


Financial analysts saw the run-up in the stock market in early 2010 as a possible melt up because unemployment rates continued to be high, both residential and commercial real estate values continued to suffer and retail investors continued to take money out of stocks.

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    An announcement by an investor who holds a security that he or ...
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