Member Payment Dependent Note

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DEFINITION of 'Member Payment Dependent Note'

A note that is issued by Lending Club. The income from these notes is used to make loans to club members. Member Payment Dependent Notes, issued in 2008, had an initial maturity of just three years and four business days and accrued interest from the date of their issuance. Payments are made monthly, and the loans have no underwriters and therefore no discounts from underwriters.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Member Payment Dependent Note'

Member Payment Dependent Notes are highly speculative in nature and should only be purchased by aggressive investors who can absorb the loss of their entire investment. However, these notes also pay a very high rate of interest, ranging from about 7% to nearly 20%, depending upon various factors. Because of the lack of market for these notes during 2009, many investors purchasing this note were expected to hold the note to maturity.

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