Merchant Bank

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DEFINITION of 'Merchant Bank'

A bank that deals mostly in (but is not limited to) international finance, long-term loans for companies and underwriting. Merchant banks do not provide regular banking services to the general public.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Merchant Bank'

Their knowledge in international finances make merchant banks specialists in dealing with multinational corporations.

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