Merger Arbitrage

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Merger Arbitrage'

A hedge fund strategy in which the stocks of two merging companies are simultaneously bought and sold to create a riskless profit. A merger arbitrageur looks at the risk that the merger deal will not close on time, or at all. Because of this slight uncertainty, the target company's stock will typically sell at a discount to the price that the combined company will have when the merger is closed. This discrepancy is the arbitrageur's profit.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Merger Arbitrage'

A regular portfolio manager may focus only on the profitability of the merged entity. In contrast, merger arbitrageurs care only about the probability of the deal being approved and how long it will take the deal to close.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Hedge Fund

    An aggressively managed portfolio of investments that uses leveraged, ...
  2. Acquisition

    A corporate action in which a company buys most, if not all, ...
  3. Strategic Buyer

    A type of buyer in an acquisition that has a specific reason ...
  4. Arbitrage

    The simultaneous purchase and sale of an asset in order to profit ...
  5. Market Arbitrage

    Purchasing and selling the same security at the same time in ...
  6. Merger

    The combining of two or more companies, generally by offering ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the difference between the cost of capital and the discount rate?

    The cost of capital refers to the actual cost of financing business activity through either debt or equity capital. The discount ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Why is Manchester United (MANU) carrying so much debt?

    The takeover of Manchester United by the Glazer family beginning in 2005 saddled the historic club with substantial amounts ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How does arbitrage affect the price of exchange traded funds (ETFs)?

    Arbitrage may be used to bring the market value of an exchange-traded fund (ETF) back into line with the net asset value ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How does the market share of a few companies affect the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index ...

    In economics and commercial law, the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI) is a widely used measure that indicates the amount ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Why should management teams focus more on horizontal integration?

    Management teams should focus more on horizontal integrations because they allow for economies of scale, economies of scope, ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What does the rule of 70 indicate about a country's future economic growth?

    The rule of 70 could be used to indicate the approximate number of years that it would take a company's economic growth to ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    Investment Strategies For Volatile Markets

    Read on to learn some investment strategies when the volatility is high.
  2. Options & Futures

    Trading The Odds With Arbitrage

    Profiting from arbitrage is not only for market makers - retail traders can find opportunity in risk arbitrage.
  3. Options & Futures

    Alternative Assets For Average Investors

    These investments can add a new level of diversification to your portfolio.
  4. Options & Futures

    Hedge Funds: Higher Returns Or Just High Fees?

    Discover the advantages and pitfalls of hedge funds and the questions to ask when choosing one.
  5. Options & Futures

    Hedge Funds Hunt For Upside, Regardless Of The Market

    Hedge funds seek positive absolute returns, and engage in aggressive strategies to make this happen.
  6. Active Trading Fundamentals

    Trade Takeover Stocks With Merger Arbitrage

    This high-risk strategy attempts to profit from price discrepancies that arise during acquisitions.
  7. Options & Futures

    The Basics Of Mergers And Acquisitions

    Learn what corporate restructuring is, why companies do it and why it sometimes doesn't work.
  8. Fundamental Analysis

    Calculating Future Value

    Future value is the value of an asset or cash at a specified date in the future that is equivalent in value to a specified sum today.
  9. Economics

    What is Deadweight Loss?

    Mainly used in economics, deadweight loss can be applied to any deficiency caused by an inefficient allocation of resources.
  10. Economics

    How to Do a Cost-Benefit Analysis

    The benefits of a given situation or business-related action are summed and then the costs associated with taking that action are subtracted.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Net Worth

    The amount by which assets exceed liabilities. Net worth is a concept applicable to individuals and businesses as a key measure ...
  2. Stop-Loss Order

    An order placed with a broker to sell a security when it reaches a certain price. A stop-loss order is designed to limit ...
  3. Covered Call

    An options strategy whereby an investor holds a long position in an asset and writes (sells) call options on that same asset ...
  4. Butterfly Spread

    A neutral option strategy combining bull and bear spreads. Butterfly spreads use four option contracts with the same expiration ...
  5. Unlevered Beta

    A type of metric that compares the risk of an unlevered company to the risk of the market. The unlevered beta is the beta ...
  6. Moving Average - MA

    A widely used indicator in technical analysis that helps smooth out price action by filtering out the “noise” from random ...
Trading Center