Merger Deficit

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Merger Deficit'

An accounting term used to describe the situation when the total value of the share capital used to purchase another company is less then the total value of the equity purchased. The merger does not necessarily have to be an all-stock acquisition.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Merger Deficit'

In other words, a merger deficit arises when a company uses funds it raised in new stock issues to purchase the stock of another company. The stock purchased must be worth more then the share capital used to purchase it in order for the deference to be classified as a merger deficit.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Acquisition

    A corporate action in which a company buys most, if not all, ...
  2. Takeover

    A corporate action where an acquiring company makes a bid for ...
  3. Share Capital

    Funds raised by issuing shares in return for cash or other considerations. ...
  4. Takeunder

    An offer to purchase or acquire a public company at a price per ...
  5. Merger

    The combining of two or more companies, generally by offering ...
  6. Acquisition Premium

    The difference between the estimated real value of a company ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How are contingent liabilities reflected on a balance sheet

    Contingent liabilities need to pass two thresholds before they can be reported in the financial statements. First, it must ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How do businesses determine if an asset may be impaired?

    In the United States, assets are considered impaired when net carrying value (book value) exceeds expected future cash flows. ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How can I set up an accrual accounting system for a small business?

    First, determine whether accrual accounting makes the most sense practically and financially. If the small business is also ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why is work in progress (WIP) considered a current asset in accounting?

    Accountants consider work in progress (WIP) to be a current asset because it is a type of inventory asset. Accountants consider ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What exactly does EBITDA margin tell investors about a company?

    EBITDA stands for earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization. EBITDA margins provide investors a snapshot ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How can you use a cash flow statement to make a budget?

    To use the cash flow statement to make a budget, a company needs to combine the operating cash flow portion of its cash flow ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    The Merger - What To Do When Companies Converge

    Learn how to invest in companies before, during and after they join together.
  2. Investing

    Mergers Put Money In Shareholders' Pockets

    Learn the five ways mergers and acquisitions can increase a company's value.
  3. Options & Futures

    The Basics Of Mergers And Acquisitions

    Learn what corporate restructuring is, why companies do it and why it sometimes doesn't work.
  4. Economics

    What is a Management Buyout?

    A management buyout, or MBO, is a transaction where a company's management team purchases the assets and operations of the business they manage.
  5. Fundamental Analysis

    What is Quantitative Analysis?

    Quantitative analysis refers to the use of mathematical computations to analyze markets and investments.
  6. Economics

    Explaining Residual Value

    Residual value is a measurement of how much a fixed asset is worth at the end of its lease, or at the end of its useful life.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    Why Last In First Out Is Banned Under IFRS

    We explain why Last-In-First-Out is banned under IFRS
  8. Economics

    Understanding Carrying Value

    Carrying value is the value of an asset as listed on a company’s balance sheet. Carrying value is the same as book value.
  9. Economics

    International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS)

    International Financial Reporting Standards are accounting rules and guidelines governing the reporting of different types of accounting transactions.
  10. Economics

    Explaining Property, Plant and Equipment

    Property, plant and equipment are company assets that are vital to business operations, but not easily liquidated.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Fisher Effect

    An economic theory proposed by economist Irving Fisher that describes the relationship between inflation and both real and ...
  2. Fiduciary

    1. A person legally appointed and authorized to hold assets in trust for another person. The fiduciary manages the assets ...
  3. Expected Return

    The amount one would anticipate receiving on an investment that has various known or expected rates of return. For example, ...
  4. Carrying Value

    An accounting measure of value, where the value of an asset or a company is based on the figures in the company's balance ...
  5. Capital Account

    A national account that shows the net change in asset ownership for a nation. The capital account is the net result of public ...
  6. Brand Equity

    The value premium that a company realizes from a product with a recognizable name as compared to its generic equivalent. ...
Trading Center