Merger Deficit

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DEFINITION of 'Merger Deficit'

An accounting term used to describe the situation when the total value of the share capital used to purchase another company is less then the total value of the equity purchased. The merger does not necessarily have to be an all-stock acquisition.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Merger Deficit'

In other words, a merger deficit arises when a company uses funds it raised in new stock issues to purchase the stock of another company. The stock purchased must be worth more then the share capital used to purchase it in order for the deference to be classified as a merger deficit.

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