Metrics

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DEFINITION of 'Metrics'

Parameters or measures of quantitative assessment used for measurement, comparison or to track performance or production. Analysts use metrics to compare the performance of different companies, despite the many variations between firms.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Metrics'

Metrics can refer to a company's EBITDA, earnings per share, or any other financial measures. They can also be industry specific, such as barrels of oil produced for exploration companies.

Taking the ratios of some metrics forms multiples, which further allow analysts to compare diverse firms.

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