Mexican Stock Exchange (MEX) .MX

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DEFINITION of 'Mexican Stock Exchange (MEX) .MX'

Mexico's only securities market, the Mexican Stock Exchange (in Spanish, la Bolsa Mexicana de Valores, or BMV) has its headquarters in Mexico City. Established in 1886 as the Mexican Mercantile Exchange, it adopted its current name in 1975 and is the second-largest stock exchange in Latin America (after Brazil). Its trading system is fully electronic, and its main index is the IPC.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Mexican Stock Exchange (MEX) .MX'

The types of securities exchanged through the BMV include stocks, debentures, government and corporate bonds, warrants and other derivatives. Shares of initial public offerings can be made available through the BMV. The Mexican Stock Exchange's roles include facilitating securities trading, making securities information available to the general public, promoting fair market practices, ensuring transparency and contributing to the growth of jobs and the economy in Mexico.

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