Mumbai Interbank Offered Rate - MIBOR

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DEFINITION of 'Mumbai Interbank Offered Rate - MIBOR'

The interest rate at which banks can borrow funds, in marketable size, from other banks in the Indian interbank market. The Mumbai Interbank Offered Rate (MIBOR) is calculated everyday by the National Stock Exchange of India (NSEIL) as a weighted average of lending rates of a group of banks, on funds lent to first-class borrowers.

BREAKING DOWN 'Mumbai Interbank Offered Rate - MIBOR'

The MIBOR was launched on June 15, 1998 by the Committee for the Development of the Debt Market, as an overnight rate. The NSEIL launched the 14-day MIBOR on November 10, 1998, and the one month and three month MIBORs on December 1, 1998. Since the launch, MIBOR rates have been used as benchmark rates for the majority of money market deals made in India.

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