Micro Accounting

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Micro Accounting'

Accounting at a personal, corporate or government level. Micro accounting can also refer to accounting at the individual or subunit component level of an enterprise or entity. It is diametrically opposed to macro accounting, which is concerned with accounting at the aggregate or national level.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Micro Accounting'

As conventional accounting is more like micro accounting than macro accounting (which is closer to economics), most accounting professionals are employed in micro accounting. As a result, the number of accounting positions at the individual enterprise level also vastly outnumbers those at the macro level.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Voodoo Accounting

    Creative rather than conservative accounting practices. Voodoo ...
  2. Macro Accounting

    Accounting for the total or aggregate economic activities of ...
  3. Tax Accounting

    Accounting methods that focus on taxes rather than the appearance ...
  4. Forensic Accounting

    Forensic Accounting utilizes accounting, auditing, and investigative ...
  5. Behavioral Accounting

    An accounting method which takes into account key decision makers ...
  6. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles ...

    The common set of accounting principles, standards and procedures ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How do dividend distributions affect additional paid in capital?

    Whether a dividend distribution has any effect on additional paid-in capital depends solely on what type of dividend is issued: ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Why can additional paid in capital never have a negative balance?

    The additional paid-in capital figure on a company's balance sheet can never be negative because companies do not pay investors ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. When does the fixed charge coverage ratio suggest that a company should stop borrowing ...

    Since the fixed charge coverage ratio indicates the number of times a company is capable of making its fixed charge payments ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How does additional paid in capital affect retained earnings?

    Both additional paid-in capital and retained earnings are entries under the shareholders' equity section of a company's balance ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How can I find net margin by looking a company's financial statements?

    In finance and accounting, financial statements represent the fundamental means of analyzing a company's financial position, ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What can working capital turnover ratios tell a trader?

    A company's working capital turnover ratio is traditionally positively correlated with business performance. A high, or better ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Personal Finance

    A Guide To Financial Designations

    Find out which certifications can bring you the greatest career returns.
  2. Professionals

    CPA, CFA Or CFP® - Pick Your Abbreviation Carefully

    A couple of letters can mean a big difference. Find out which designation you need and how to get it.
  3. Retirement

    Crunch Numbers To Find The Ideal Accountant

    The phone book isn't the best place to start your search. Learn some shopping tips here.
  4. Personal Finance

    A Look At Accounting Careers

    More than just crunching numbers, this career blends detective work with trouble shooting.
  5. Options & Futures

    The Alphabet Soup Of Financial Certifications

    We decode the meaning of the many letters that can follow the names of financial professionals.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    Explaining the Common Size Income Statement

    A common size income statement expresses each account as a percentage of net sales.
  7. Professionals

    What Does an Auditor Do?

    An auditor ensures that organizations maintain accurate and honest financial records.
  8. Fundamental Analysis

    Calculating the Net Debt to EBITDA Ratio

    Financial analysts typically use the net debt to EBITDA ratio to determine a company’s ability to pay its debt.
  9. Economics

    How Does an Operating Lease Work?

    Operating lease is a term used mostly in accounting to denote a lease that gives the lessee rights to use and operate an asset without ownership.
  10. Economics

    Understanding Historical Cost

    Historical cost equals the original purchase price of an asset recorded on a company’s balance sheet.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Nuncupative Will

    A verbal will that must have two witnesses and can only deal with the distribution of personal property. A nuncupative will ...
  2. OsMA

    An abbreviation for Oscillator - Moving Average. OsMA is used in technical analysis to represent the variance between an ...
  3. Investopedia

    One of the best-known sources of financial information on the internet. Investopedia is a resource for investors, consumers ...
  4. Unfair Claims Practice

    The improper avoidance of a claim by an insurer or an attempt to reduce the size of the claim. By engaging in unfair claims ...
  5. Killer Bees

    An individual or firm that helps a company fend off a takeover attempt. A killer bee uses defensive strategies to keep an ...
  6. Sin Tax

    A state-sponsored tax that is added to products or services that are seen as vices, such as alcohol, tobacco and gambling. ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!