Micro Manager

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DEFINITION of 'Micro Manager'

A boss or manager who gives excessive supervision to employees. A micro manager, rather than telling an employee what task needs to be accomplished and by when, will watch the employee's actions closely and provide rapid criticism if the manager thinks it's necessary. Usually, the term has a negative connotation because an employee may feel that the micro manager is being condescending towards them, due to a perceived lack of faith in the employee's competency. A micro manager may also avoid the delegation process when assigning duties and exaggerate the importance of minor details to subordinates.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Micro Manager'

By contrast, a macro manager defines broad tasks for employees to accomplish and then leaves employees alone to do their work. The macro manager has confidence that he or she has hired competent workers who can complete the same task without being continually reminded of the process.

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