Microeconomic Pricing Model

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Microeconomic Pricing Model'

A model of the way prices are set within a market for a given good. According to this model, prices are set based on the balance of supply and demand in the market. In general, profit incentives are said to resemble an "invisible hand" that guides competing participants to an equilibrium price.


The demand curve in this model is determined by consumers attempting to maximize their utility, given their budget. The supply curve is set by firms attempting to maximize profits, given their costs of production and the level of demand for their product. To maximize profits, the pricing model is based around producing a quantity of goods at which total revenue minus total costs is at its greatest.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Microeconomic Pricing Model'

In general, the balance of power within the market determines who is more successful in setting prices. For example, a monopolist, such as a utility company, has a great deal of power to set prices at the most advantageous point for the firm. On the other hand, in a perfectly competitive market, such as farming, firms have little choice but to accept the prevailing market price if they wish to sell their goods.



RELATED TERMS
  1. Peak Pricing

    A form of congestion pricing where customers pay an additional ...
  2. Basing Point Pricing System

    A pricing system in which the buyer pays a base price plus a ...
  3. Average Cost Pricing Rule

    A pricing strategy that regulators impose on certain businesses ...
  4. Pricing Power

    An economic term referring to the effect that a change in a firm's ...
  5. Value-Based Pricing

    The setting of a product or service's price, based on the benefits ...
  6. Precedent Transaction Analysis

    A valuation method in which the prices paid for similar companies ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the relationship between research and development and innovation?

    Although it's possible to achieve innovation without research and development and it's possible to conduct research and development ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How is minimum transfer price calculated?

    A company that transfers goods between multiple divisions needs to establish a transfer price so that each division can track ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How does neoclassical economics relate to neoliberalism?

    While it may be likely that many neoliberal thinkers endorse the use of (or even emphasize) neoclassical economics, the two ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are common concepts and techniques of managerial accounting?

    The common concepts and techniques of managerial accounting are all the concepts and techniques that surround planning and ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How is abatement cost accounted for on financial statements?

    Abatement costs are accounted for on a company's financial statements through increases in either cost of goods sold or operational ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. According to the neoclassical growth theory, what factors influence the growth of ...

    The neoclassical growth theory builds five major variables into its time-sensitive production formula. The first is total ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Fundamental Analysis

    Great Expectations: Forecasting Sales Growth

    Predicting sales growth can be something of a black art, unless you ask the right questions.
  2. Bonds & Fixed Income

    How Bond Market Pricing Works

    Learn the basic rules that govern how bond prices are determined.
  3. Economics

    What Determines Gas Prices?

    Gas prices are influenced by more than supply and demand. Find out what determines the price you pay at the pump.
  4. Economics

    Do Cheap Imported Goods Cost Americans Jobs?

    Flooding the market with cheap products can mean job losses and even market collapse - but dumping isn't as threatening as it seems.
  5. Options & Futures

    Mark-To-Market Mayhem

    Did this accounting convention contribute to the credit crisis of 2008? Find out here.
  6. Economics

    Understanding Limited Liability

    Limited liability is a legal concept that protects equity owners from personal losses due to their ownership interest in the company.
  7. Economics

    Calculating Income Elasticity of Demand

    Income elasticity of demand is a measure of how consumer demand changes when income changes.
  8. Economics

    Understanding Implicit Costs

    An implicit cost is any cost associated with not taking a certain action.
  9. Fundamental Analysis

    Explaining the Empirical Rule

    The empirical rule provides a quick estimate of the spread of data in a normal statistical distribution.
  10. Economics

    Understanding Diseconomies of Scale

    Diseconomies of scale is the point where a business no longer experiences decreasing costs per unit of output.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Bund

    A bond issued by Germany's federal government, or the German word for "bond." Bunds are the German equivalent of U.S. Treasury ...
  2. European Central Bank - ECB

    The central bank responsible for the monetary system of the European Union (EU) and the euro currency. The bank was formed ...
  3. Quantitative Easing

    An unconventional monetary policy in which a central bank purchases private sector financial assets in order to lower interest ...
  4. Current Account Deficit

    A measurement of a country’s trade in which the value of goods and services it imports exceeds the value of goods and services ...
  5. International Monetary Fund - IMF

    An international organization created for the purpose of: 1. Promoting global monetary and exchange stability. 2. Facilitating ...
  6. Risk-Return Tradeoff

    The principle that potential return rises with an increase in risk. Low levels of uncertainty (low-risk) are associated with ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!