Middle Office

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DEFINITION of 'Middle Office'

The group of employees in a financial services company that manages risk, calculates profits and losses, and (generally) is in charge of information technology. The middle office draws on the resources of both the front and the back offices.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Middle Office'

A financial services company is logically broken up into three parts: the front office includes sales personnel and corporate finance; the middle office manages risk and IT resources; and the back office provides administrative and support services.

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