Military Clause

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DEFINITION of 'Military Clause'

A clause found in most residential leases that permits military personnel to get out of their rental lease. The military clause allows military personnel that are called up to get back their security deposit if they are called into duty. This eliminates a worrisome headache for armed forces personnel.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Military Clause'

The military clause is one more benefit available to members of the U.S. military. This clause is usually incorporated into leases of dwelling units around military bases. This clause allows landlords to reduce their vacancies by accommodating military tenants.

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