Minimum Deposit

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DEFINITION of 'Minimum Deposit'

The smallest amount of money that an investor/trader must initially deposit into a new brokerage account. Minimum deposits are required to cover the baseline costs associated with setting up a new account and maintaining it thereafter.

Also referred to as "Minimum to Open an Account."


INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Minimum Deposit'

Depending on the purpose of the account, minimum deposit amounts can range anywhere from $0 to hundreds of thousands of dollars. Most large, well-known companies will offer some form of investment account that can be started with a modest amount between $500 and $2,000 for a retail investor.

Minimum deposit levels are also found with certificates of deposit (CDs) at a banking institution, or retirement accounts such as IRAs.

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