Minimum Margin


DEFINITION of 'Minimum Margin'

The initial amount required to be deposited in a margin account before trading on margin or selling short. For example, the NYSE and the NASD require investors to deposit a minimum of $2,000 in cash or securities to open a margin account. Keep in mind that this amount is only a minimum - some brokerages may require you to deposit more than $2,000.

BREAKING DOWN 'Minimum Margin'

When you buy on margin, there are key levels - as governed by the Federal Reserve Board's Regulation T - that must be maintained throughout the life of a trade. The minimum margin, which states that a broker can't extend any credit to accounts with less than $2,000 in cash (or securities) is the first requirement. Second, an initial margin of 50% is required for a trade to be entered. Third, the maintenance margin says that you must maintain equity of at least 25% or be hit with a margin call.

  1. Maintenance Margin

    The minimum amount of equity that must be maintained in a margin ...
  2. Margin Call

    A broker's demand on an investor using margin to deposit additional ...
  3. Margin Account

    A brokerage account in which the broker lends the customer cash ...
  4. Leverage

    1. The use of various financial instruments or borrowed capital, ...
  5. Initial Margin

    The percentage of the purchase price of securities (that can ...
  6. Federal Reserve Board - FRB

    The governing body of the Federal Reserve System. The seven members ...
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