Minority IPO

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DEFINITION

An initial public offering in which a parent company spins off one of its subsidiaries or divisions, but retains a majority stake in the company after issuance. This means that after the public offering, the parent company will still have a controlling stake of the new public company.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

The parent company may retain this majority stake forever or may slowly dissolve their ownership over time. This type of IPO allows the company to raise funds, accessing the value of the subsidiary, to fund its own operation or return value to shareholders.


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