Mint

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DEFINITION of 'Mint'

The primary producer of a country's coin currency. The mint has the consent of the government to manufacture coins to be used as legal tender. Along with production, the mint is also responsible for the distribution of the currency, protection of the mint's gold and silver assets, and overseeing its various production facilities.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Mint'

A country's mint is not always located or even owned by the home country. For example in 1906, the San Francisco Mint produced 50-centavo silver coins for Mexico. The United States Mint was created in 1792 and is a self-funded agency with more than $1 billion in revenue annually.

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