DEFINITION of 'Money Market Account Extra - MMAX'

An account structure that provides depositors with the ability to secure FDIC insurance on large deposits that would otherwise exceed the normal insurance limit of $250,000. The MMAX structure allows banks to attract large depositors, including retail, commercial and public entities.

Through the program, banks can accept deposits well above the FDIC-insurance limit from any one retail or commercial customer in money market deposits. The funds are then distributed into deposit accounts among multiple banks in IDC's Deposit Network. No more than $250,000 can be deposited in any one bank.

BREAKING DOWN 'Money Market Account Extra - MMAX'

The advantage of MMAX accounts is that instead of being covered only up to the FDIC deposit-insurance amount, the individual can have more funds insured. For example, if Arthur had $500,000, he could use the MMAX structure to have two banks each hold $250,000; thus, the FDIC would insure the full $500,000.

Depositors can open and contribute to an MMAX account through any of IDC's network banks nationwide. They are limited to a specified number of withdrawals from their MMAX account.

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