Mobile Commerce

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DEFINITION of 'Mobile Commerce'

The use of wireless handheld devices such as cellular phones and laptops to conduct commercial transactions online. Mobile commerce transactions continues to grow, and the term includes the purchase and sale of a wide range of goods and services, online banking, bill payment, information delivery and so on. Also known as m-commerce.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Mobile Commerce'

The range of devices that are enabled for mobile commerce is growing, having expanded in recent years to include smartphones and tablet computers. The increasing adoption of electronic commerce provided a strong foundation for mobile commerce, which is on a very strong growth trajectory for years to come.


The rapid growth of mobile commerce is being driven by a number of positive factors - the demand for applications from an increasingly mobile customer and consumer base; the rapid adoption of online commerce thanks to the resolution of security issues; and technological advances that have given wireless handheld devices advanced capabilities and substantial computing power.

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