DEFINITION of 'Monetize'

To monetize is to convert an asset into or establish something as money or legal tender. The term monetize has different meanings depending on the context. It can refer to methods utilized to generate profit, while it also can literally mean the conversion of an asset into money. For example, the U.S. Federal Reserve can monetize the nation's debt; this involves the process of purchasing debt (treasuries) which in turn increases the money supply. This essentially turns the debt into money (monetization).


Another example comes from websites monetizing their content. Many are set up to earn money through advertisers. When people who browse the particular site click on one of the advertisers' links, the owner of the website earns a small amount of money (this is known as pay-per-click, or PPC advertising). If the website attracts enough visitors, the small amount paid by the advertisers for each click can add up to substantial monetization.

Another method used to monetize a website is the placement of banner advertisements. If a particular website has proven that it attracts a certain number of visitors each month, companies may pay to place advertisements that appear on the home page, certain pages or every page of the website, depending on the agreement between the website owner and the advertiser. Typically, larger and more prominently displayed advertisements cost more.

Other methods of website monetization include CPM advertising (cost-per-mille), text link advertisements, affiliate marketing and monetization widgets.

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