Money Market Yield

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DEFINITION of 'Money Market Yield'

The interest rate earned by investing in securities with high liquidity and maturities of less than one year such as negotiable certificates of deposit, U.S. Treasury bills and municipal notes. Money market yield is calculated by taking the holding period yield and multiplying it by a 360-day bank year divided by days to maturity. It can also be calculated using bank discount yield.


Also known as "CD-equivalent yield".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Money Market Yield'

To earn a money market yield, it is necessary to have a money market account. Banks offer money market accounts because they need to borrow funds on a short-term basis to meet reserve requires and to participate in interbank lending. The money market yield will be lower than the yield on stocks and bonds because of the low risk associated with money market investments.

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