Money On The Sidelines


DEFINITION of 'Money On The Sidelines'

The cash that is held either in savings or in low-risk, low-yield investment vehicles, such as certificates of deposits (CDs), instead of being placed in investments that have the potential for greater rewards, such as the stock market. Money on the sidelines is kept away from risk, especially during periods of economic or market uncertainty.

BREAKING DOWN 'Money On The Sidelines'

Money on the sidelines describes the vast amount of cash that is held in low-risk investments while individuals and companies wait for economic conditions to improve. Legendary investor Warren Buffett is known to take advantage of times when most investors are on the sidelines, opening or adding to positions in undervalued companies at bargain prices. Buffet has said of his investing strategy, "Be fearful when others are greedy, and greedy when others are fearful".

  1. Cash

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  3. Net Liquid Assets

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  4. Liquid Asset

    An asset that can be converted into cash quickly and with minimal ...
  5. Certificate Of Deposit - CD

    A savings certificate entitling the bearer to receive interest. ...
  6. Asset

    1. A resource with economic value that an individual, corporation ...
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