Money-Weighted Rate Of Return

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DEFINITION of 'Money-Weighted Rate Of Return'

A measure of the rate of return for an asset or portfolio of assets. It is calculated by finding the rate of return that will set the present values of all cash flows and terminal values equal to the value of the initial investment. The money-weighted rate of return is equivalent to the internal rate of return (IRR).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Money-Weighted Rate Of Return'

There are many ways to measure returns for assets, and it is important to know which method is being used when reviewing asset performance. Money-weighted rate of return incorporates the size and timing of cash flows, so it is an effective measure for returns on a portfolio. Another popular return calculation is the Time-Weighted Returns method.

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