Moneyness

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DEFINITION of 'Moneyness'

A description of a derivative relating its strike price to the price of its underlying asset. Moneyness describes the intrinsic value of an option in its current state.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Moneyness'

Moneyness tells option holders whether exercising will lead to a profit. There are many forms of moneyness, including in,out or at the money. Moneyness looks at the value of an option if you were to exercise it right away. A loss would signify the option is out of the money, while a gain would mean it's in the money. At the money means that you will break even upon exercising the option.

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