Money Zero Maturity - MZM

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DEFINITION of 'Money Zero Maturity - MZM'

A measure of the liquid money supply within an economy. MZM represents all money in M2 less the time deposits, plus all money market funds.

BREAKING DOWN 'Money Zero Maturity - MZM'

MZM has become one of the preferred measures of money supply because it better represents money readily available within the economy for spending and consumption. This measurement derives its name from its mixture of all the liquid and zero maturity money found within the three "M's."

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