Monoline

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DEFINITION of 'Monoline'

A business that focuses on operating in one specific financial area. The main advantage of monolines is that these companies have specialized skills and provide expertise beyond what can usually be expected from companies that businesses are spread across many different financial areas.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Monoline'

For example, monoline insurers give investors and issuers the confidence to participate in the market by providing liquidity and financial protection. Without fully understanding the entire system and how it all comes together, a company is unable to provide its customers with quality service. Due to the expertise that monoline companies have in the industry, they are able to reduce operating cost, enhance customer service and evaluate/manage risk much more efficiently.

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