Monopolist

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DEFINITION of 'Monopolist'

A person, group or organization with a monopoly. In other words, an individual or company that controls all of the market for a particular good or service.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Monopolist'

A monopolist probably also believes in policies that favor monopolies since it gives them greater power. A monopolist has little incentive to improve their product because customers have no alternatives. Instead, their motivation is focused on protecting the monopoly.

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