Montreal Exchange

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DEFINITION of 'Montreal Exchange'

A Canadian derivatives exchange that facilitates the trading of stock options, interest rate futures and options, as well as index options and futures. Located in Montreal, Quebec, it is the country's main financial derivative market, while the Winnipeg Commodities Exchange in Manitoba is the home to Canadian commodity derivative trading.

BREAKING DOWN 'Montreal Exchange'

The equity option trading on the Montreal Exchange covers most of the larger Canada-traded companies but is not as broad as the U.S. options markets. The interest rate derivatives cover short-term banker's acceptances ranging from the overnight rate to the three-month rate and two- and ten-year Canadian Government Bonds. The index futures and options cover the S&P Canada 60 index and several S&P/TSX sector indexes.

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RELATED FAQS
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  3. How does a forward contract differ from a call option?

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  4. Why do companies enter into futures contracts?

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