Moral Hazard


DEFINITION of 'Moral Hazard'

The risk that a party to a transaction has not entered into the contract in good faith, has provided misleading information about its assets, liabilities or credit capacity, or has an incentive to take unusual risks in a desperate attempt to earn a profit before the contract settles.


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BREAKING DOWN 'Moral Hazard'

Moral hazard can be present any time two parties come into agreement with one another. Each party in a contract may have the opportunity to gain from acting contrary to the principles laid out by the agreement. For example, when a salesperson is paid a flat salary with no commissions for his or her sales, there is a danger that the salesperson may not try very hard to sell the business owner's goods because the wage stays the same regardless of how much or how little the owner benefits from the salesperson's work.

Moral hazard can be somewhat reduced by the placing of responsibilities on both parties of a contract. In the example of the salesperson, the manager may decide to pay a wage comprised of both salary and commissions. With such a wage, the salesperson would have more incentive not only to produce more profits but also to prevent losses for the company.

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  3. How did moral hazard contribute to the financial crisis of 2008?

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  4. Why is moral hazard so prevalent in the financial services industry?

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  8. What is the difference between a principle agent problem and moral hazard?

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  9. What are some examples of moral hazard in the business world?

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