Moral Obligation Bond

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DEFINITION of 'Moral Obligation Bond'

A type of revenue bond issued by a municipality or similar government body. A moral obligation bond not only gives investors the tax exemption benefits inherent in a municipal bond, but also provides an additional moral pledge of commitment against default. The issuing body's commitment is supported by a reserve fund established to meet any debt service costs the government may be unable to make.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Moral Obligation Bond'

It is important to note that with a moral obligation bond, the additional security provided by the government is only morally - and not legally - binding. However, the pledge is generally regarded as being as credible as a legally binding promise because the issuing government would face negative credit rating effects if it failed to honor the pledge.

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