Moratorium

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DEFINITION

1) A period of time in which there is a suspension of a specific activity until future events warrant a removal of the suspension or issues regarding the activity have been resolved.

2) In bankruptcy law, a legally binding halt of the right to collect debt.



INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

1) For example, if a company is going through rough times it might have a moratorium on advertising spending. In other words, to cut costs, it won't spend any money on advertising.

2) Such action may be imposed by a government, or taken voluntarily by a private business, usually in times of economic crisis such as an earthquake or flood, in order to provide people with time to stabilize their finances before dealing with potential problems such as a mortgage default and foreclosure.


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