Morbidity Rate

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Morbidity Rate'

The frequency with which a disease appears in a population. Morbidity rates are used in actuarial professions, such as health insurance, life insurance and long-term care insurance, to determine the correct premiums to charge to customers. Morbidity rates help insurers predict the likelihood that an insured will contract or develop any number of specified diseases.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Morbidity Rate'

The ability to accurately predict how many customers will get sick and what diseases they will get sick with helps insurers predict how much money they will spend to provide treatment for insurance customers. Thus, accurate morbidity rates are crucial for keeping insurance companies in business. Morbidity rate should not be confused with mortality rate, which is the frequency of death in a given population.

RELATED TERMS
  1. American Experience Table

    A set of data, presented in table format, showing when Americans ...
  2. American Risk and Insurance Association

    A professional organization for academics and associates in the ...
  3. Mortality Table

    A table that shows the rate of deaths occurring in a defined ...
  4. Risk Management

    The process of identification, analysis and either acceptance ...
  5. Long-Term Care (LTC) Insurance

    Coverage that provides nursing-home care, home-health care, personal ...
  6. Mortality And Expense Risk Charge

    A variable annuity fee included in certain annuity or insurance ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How is accounting in the United States different from international accounting?

    Despite major efforts by the Financial Accounting Standards Board, or FASB, and the International Accounting Standards Board, ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the variance/covariance matrix or parametric method in Value at Risk (VaR)?

    The parametric method, also known as the variance-covariance method, is a risk management technique for calculating the value ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How are transfer prices set?

    The United States, like most nations, does not want to allow transfer pricing methods that reduce the amount of taxes the ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is backtesting in Value at Risk (VaR)?

    The value at risk is a statistical risk management technique that monitors and quantifies the risk level associated with ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do I discount Free Cash Flow to the Firm (FCFF)?

    Discounted free cash flow for the firm (FCFF) should be equal to all of the cash inflows and outflows, adjusted to present ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What's the difference between a confidence level and a confidence interval in Value ...

    The value at risk (VaR) uses both the confidence level and confidence interval. A risk manager uses the VaR to monitor and ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Home & Auto

    A Look At Single-Premium Life Insurance

    Want to provide for your dependents and finance your own long-term care? Learn more here.
  2. Home & Auto

    A New Approach To Long-Term Care Insurance

    This practical product can protect you from the rising cost of care and provide for your beneficiaries at the same time.
  3. Insurance

    How Much Life Insurance Should You Carry?

    Learn how much - if any - insurance you really need.
  4. Retirement

    Variable Vs. Variable Universal Life Insurance

    Do you know why you might need one policy versus the other? Read on to find out.
  5. Options & Futures

    Long-Term Care Insurance: You Have Options

    The latest offerings provide more coverage and the ability to pick and choose what types of coverage you'll need.
  6. Home & Auto

    Life Insurance Clauses Determine Your Coverage

    Understanding these key parts of your policy will help you to ensure that your family will be covered.
  7. Insurance

    Life Insurance: Putting A Price On Peace Of Mind

    Would your death leave loved ones financially stranded? Find out how to ease your mind and keep them protected.
  8. Economics

    What is Adverse Selection?

    Adverse selection occurs when one party in a transaction has more information than the other, especially in insurance and finance-related activities.
  9. Economics

    Understanding Carrying Value

    Carrying value is the value of an asset as listed on a company’s balance sheet. Carrying value is the same as book value.
  10. Economics

    International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS)

    International Financial Reporting Standards are accounting rules and guidelines governing the reporting of different types of accounting transactions.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Fixed-Income Arbitrage

    An investment strategy that attempts to profit from arbitrage opportunities in interest rate securities. When using a fixed-income ...
  2. Venture-Capital-Backed IPO

    The selling to the public of shares in a company that has previously been funded primarily by private investors. The alternative ...
  3. Merger Arbitrage

    A hedge fund strategy in which the stocks of two merging companies are simultaneously bought and sold to create a riskless ...
  4. Market Failure

    An economic term that encompasses a situation where, in any given market, the quantity of a product demanded by consumers ...
  5. Unsystematic Risk

    Company or industry specific risk that is inherent in each investment. The amount of unsystematic risk can be reduced through ...
  6. Security Market Line - SML

    A line that graphs the systematic, or market, risk versus return of the whole market at a certain time and shows all risky ...
Trading Center