Morganization

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DEFINITION of 'Morganization'

Monopolization techniques used by J.P. Morgan in the nineteenth century. J.P. Morgon used his reputation to lure European financiers into America by taking over an industry and stabilizing it through monopoly. Morgan would then turn the industry into a single, stable, profitable entity that was much more palatable to European bankers.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Morganization'

Morgan "morganized" the railroad industry first, taking over small underfinanced companies. He then took over the steel, electricity and banking industries the same way. The solid, steady growth that resulted was successful in transforming the U.S. from a debtor nation to one that was able to lend money to others.

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