Mortality Table

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DEFINITION of 'Mortality Table'

A table that shows the rate of deaths occurring in a defined population during a selected time interval, or survival from birth to any given age. Statistics included in the mortality table show the probability a person's death before their next birthday, based on their age.

Death-rate data help determine prices paid by people who have recently purchased life insurance.

A mortality table is also known as a "life table," an "actuarial table" or a "morbidity table."

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Mortality Table'

Life tables are usually constructed separately for men and for women. Other characteristics can also be included to distinguish different risks, such as smoking status, occupation and socio-economic class. There are even actuarial tables that determine longevity in relation to weight.

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