Mortgage Broker

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DEFINITION of 'Mortgage Broker'

An intermediary who brings mortgage borrowers and mortgage lenders together, but does not use its own funds to originate mortgages. A mortgage broker gathers paperwork from a borrower, and passes that paperwork along to a mortgage lender for underwriting and approval. The mortgage funds are then lent in the name of the mortgage lender. A mortgage broker collects an origination fee and/or a yield spread premium from the lender as compensation for its services.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Mortgage Broker'

A mortgage broker is not to be confused with a mortgage banker, which closes and funds a mortgage with its own funds. Mortgage brokers frequently facilitate transactions for mortgage bankers.

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